Hobart Airspace Design Review

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Consultation has concluded and this change has been implemented

Image of a Qantas Airways Australia approaching tarmac for landing at Hobart Airport

Following the completion of the Hobart Airspace Design Review, new flight paths for Hobart Airport arrivals and departures commenced operation on 7 November 2019.

For information on aircraft operations in your area see our Community Specific Fact Sheets and How many flights arrive and depart from Hobart Airport every day? Poster.

Why did Flight Paths have to change?

We introduced changes to arrival and departure flight paths at Hobart Airport in September 2017. The changes were designed to organise aircraft departing from or arriving into Hobart Airport onto standard routes called Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs).

In response to negative community feedback regarding aircraft noise and visual impacts, we committed to amending the arrival flight path for Runway 30, and this was implemented in March 2018. We additionally committed to reviewing the design of the SIDs and STARs for runway 12 and runway 30 within the operational requirements and constraints at Hobart Airport.

What activities formed part of the Review?

A timeline of the Hobart Airspace Design Review was developed to present the progress of the review.

How did we listen?

Submissions closed on 7 January 2019.

Feedback was sought via the following

  • Online Submission form
  • Written submissions (email and post)
  • Onsite Community Consultation sessions were held in November 2018 in Bagdad, Brighton, Campania, Copping, Dunalley, Primrose Sands, Sorell, Richmond and Taranna.

Following the Hobart Airspace Design Review consultation period, we carefully analysed and considered all the feedback and submissions received through a comprehensive process to develop the final flight path design. The Consultation Summary Report is a summary of feedback received through engagement activities undertaken between 31 October 2018 and 7 January 2019.

The final design was shaped by this feedback, delivering a range of safety enhancements and operational efficiencies, while minimising the effect of aircraft operations on communities and the environment, where possible.

We invite you to read the Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report, which contains the final design and how we considered feedback.

Our community engagement activities in support of the final design included on-site community updates in the Hobart area and online Q&A sessions during May 2019.

Following the completion of the Hobart Airspace Design Review, new flight paths for Hobart Airport arrivals and departures commenced operation on 7 November 2019.

For information on aircraft operations in your area see our Community Specific Fact Sheets and How many flights arrive and depart from Hobart Airport every day? Poster.

Why did Flight Paths have to change?

We introduced changes to arrival and departure flight paths at Hobart Airport in September 2017. The changes were designed to organise aircraft departing from or arriving into Hobart Airport onto standard routes called Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) and Standard Instrument Arrivals (STARs).

In response to negative community feedback regarding aircraft noise and visual impacts, we committed to amending the arrival flight path for Runway 30, and this was implemented in March 2018. We additionally committed to reviewing the design of the SIDs and STARs for runway 12 and runway 30 within the operational requirements and constraints at Hobart Airport.

What activities formed part of the Review?

A timeline of the Hobart Airspace Design Review was developed to present the progress of the review.

How did we listen?

Submissions closed on 7 January 2019.

Feedback was sought via the following

  • Online Submission form
  • Written submissions (email and post)
  • Onsite Community Consultation sessions were held in November 2018 in Bagdad, Brighton, Campania, Copping, Dunalley, Primrose Sands, Sorell, Richmond and Taranna.

Following the Hobart Airspace Design Review consultation period, we carefully analysed and considered all the feedback and submissions received through a comprehensive process to develop the final flight path design. The Consultation Summary Report is a summary of feedback received through engagement activities undertaken between 31 October 2018 and 7 January 2019.

The final design was shaped by this feedback, delivering a range of safety enhancements and operational efficiencies, while minimising the effect of aircraft operations on communities and the environment, where possible.

We invite you to read the Hobart Airspace Design Review Final Report, which contains the final design and how we considered feedback.

Our community engagement activities in support of the final design included on-site community updates in the Hobart area and online Q&A sessions during May 2019.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Airservices representatives will be available to answer your questions live during the following dates and times:

  • 10am to 11am, Thursday 30 May
  • 5pm to 6pm, Thursday 30 May
  • 12pm to 1pm, Friday 31 May
Please visit our FAQ section to see whether your question has already been responded to.

We will endeavor to moderate and answer all questions submitted during the live chat. However, we are preferencing questions that relate to how aircraft will operate on the new flight paths.

Please note that all questions will be moderated in accordance with our Moderation Rules before being answered publicly. 

If we are unable to get to all questions received by the close off time, responses will appear on the Q&A thread on the next business day.

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    How do I get a detailed noise modelling map for example 30 Decibels for both winter and summer time over all the affected and unaffected areas. This is for people who want to take into consideration if they need to relocate.

    GonePlaneCrazy Asked over 1 year ago

    Our noise modelling maps are available under our Resources tab and present noise events that are over 60 decibels (dB(A)) and again over 70 decibels (dB(A)).

    We don't produce noise maps below 60 decibels (dB(A)) as this level equates to the indoor design guide level of 50 dB(A) - which is the approximate sound of a refrigerator running in the background.

    Source: Australian Standard AS2021:2015 Acoustics – Aircraft noise intrusion – Building siting and construction

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    If potentially double the number of planes could be arriving/departing by 2030, shouldn't Airservices in general be compromising with affected communities by offering a night time curfew for Hobart Airport?

    GonePlaneCrazy Asked over 1 year ago

    Curfews are not part of Airservices accountabilities, as they are a matter for the airport.  Further information on curfews can be found at:

    https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/aviation/environmental/curfews/index.aspx 

    http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/wp-content/uploads/11-152FAC_Airport-curfews_WEB.pdf

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    I have read that the numbers of Hobart passengers expected to double by 2030 and with larger noisier international jets, why was this not used in considering the affect on the communities near flight paths? That is only 12 months ahead numbers/noise modelling was used.

    GonePlaneCrazy Asked over 1 year ago

    We have looked at a 10+ year horizon to consider how aviation growth in the region will need to be supported with safe and efficient flight paths. The final design is appropriate for different operators and aircraft, including international operations. To future proof the design, we have separated the jet and non-jet departure paths, and included the latest technologies such as 'Smart Tracking' approaches in addition to the standard RNAV approaches.   

    In considering the effect of future growth on communities, we aimed to distribute the flight paths to minimise the concentrated effects as much as possible.

    Typically, noise modelling for flight path designs uses either the airport data in the Master Development Plan, or a 12 month future estimate based on adjusted current activity - whichever is greater.  In this case, the 12 month future estimate was used. 

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    Why have final flight paths been decided without even trialling them to see what the noise and visual pollution effects are?

    GonePlaneCrazy Asked over 1 year ago

    The final flight path designs were assessed for environmental impacts, including noise and visual effects, using our approved environmental assessment methodology. The modelling tool used to conduct this assessment is the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA, USA) latest software, Aviation Environment Design Tool (AEDT). This software has been verified and validated for accuracy around the world.

    Noise contour pictures are available for your reference in our resources library.